ICSSEA 2010 - Presentation

 
 

Harnessing the Power and Promise of Distributed Software and Systems


We live in a connected world – an interdependent web of economic, social and political entities. Actions of one potentially affect the behaviors of all. Whether you believe that information technology helped spawn this connected and interdependent world or merely co-evolved with it, it is clear that modern software and systems engineering has been profoundly impacted. This conference is dedicated to the development of software and systems that harness the power in this web rather than fall victim to it.

The ubiquitous spread of the Internet and the World Wide Web has had a twofold impact on software and systems engineering: it has impacted the way enterprises interact with their customers and partners, and it has changed the way they develop software applications. Among the more common approaches that are being used are service-oriented architectures, web services, SAAS, cloud computing, P2P, grids, JBI and SCA. These approaches leverage the distributed nature of the systems to make them more flexible, adaptable, and better suited to users’ needs. In contrast to the tightly-coupled designs of older technologies, modern software and systems deliver capability through a kaleidoscope of loosely-coupled elements riding on infrastructure. Oftentimes project management is also a distributed process. Not only are teams geographically spread, but also a team must cooperate with members outside their own organization in order to successfully complete a project. Software and systems producers can no longer act in total isolation – they must themselves become dependent on component or service providers, on VAR’s, and even on proactive customers.

Co-organized by TELECOM ParisTech, CS Communication & Systems, and the Génie Logiciel quarterly, the 22nd edition of the ICSSEA Conference (International Conference on Software & Systems Engineering and their Applications) will be held in Paris on December 7-9, 2010. By gathering actors from across the enterprise and research worlds, it aims at providing a critical survey of the status of tools, methods, and processes for elaborating software & systems. Lectures and discussions will be conducted with the issues of coupling and interoperability in distributed software and systems as the leitmotiv.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program   -  Global View

 
 
 

Tuesday, December 7

 


 
9:00 - 9h30
 
  Registration  
  9:30 - 12:00   session 1
Inaugural Lectures
 
 
12:00 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 16:00   session 2
Design & Verification Platform
  session 3
Tutorial 1: Basics and Application Trends for Testing & Test Control Notation TTCN-3
 
 
16:00 - 16:30
 
  Break  
  16:30 - 18:00   session 4
SysML Applications
  Tutorial 1: Continued  
  18:00 - 20:00  
Concert
 
 
                     

 

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program   -  Global View

 
 
 


Wednesday, December 8

 
         
  9:00 - 10:30   session 5
Testing
  session 6
Tutorial 2: Complexity & Systems Engineering
 
 
10:30 - 11:00
 
  Break  
  11:00 - 12:30   session 7
SOA
  Tutorial 2: Continued  
 
12:30 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 15:30   session 8
Information Systems
  Tutorial 2: Continued  
  15:30 - 16:00  
Break
 
 
  16:30 - 17:30   session 8
Continued

session 9
AOP

  Tutorial 2: Continued  

 

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program   -  Global View

 
 
 

Thursday, December 9

 
         
  9:00 - 10:30   session 10
Requirements
  session 13
Tutorial 2: Systems Modeling with SysML/UML
 
 
10:30 - 11:00
 
  Break  
  11:00 - 12:30   session 11
VV & Formal Methods
  Tutorial 3: Continued  
 
12:30 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 15:30   session 12
Process & Project Managment
  session 15
Quality Assessment & VV
 
  15:30 - 16:00   session 14
Closing
 
 
                     

 

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program   -   Detailed View

 
 
 

Tuesday, December 7

 


 
9:00 - 9h30
 
  Registration  
  9:30 - 12:00   session 1
Inaugural Lectures

Architecting and innovating: the role of system critical parameter  
Ronald B. Campbell – MIT (USA)

Software engineering must be collaboration-aware  
Vassilka Kirova – Alcatel-Lucent (USA), in cooperation with
Norbert Jastroch – MET Communications (D),
Cyril S. Ku – William Patterson University (USA),
Thomas J. Marlowe – Seton Hall University (USA), and
Mojgan Mohtashami – Advanced Infrastructure Design (USA)

Smart electrical grids  
Colette Lewiner –Vice President, Energy, Utilities, and Chemicals Global Sector Leader, Capgemini (F)

 

 
 
12:00 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 16:00   session 2
Design & Verification Platform
  • A comprehensive framework for joint use of UML, SysML, and MARTE for performance modeling of multicore systems (Presentation & Demo)
    Thomas Robert & Vincent Perrier – CoFluent Design (F)

  • A software platform for consolidating data and designing complex systems by assembling pre-existing IP blocks (Presentation & Demo)
    Emmanuel Vaumorin – Magillem (F)

 

  session 3
Tutorial 1

Basics and application trends for TTCN-3
Axel Rennoch and Ina Schieferdecker – Fraunhofer FOKUS (D)

 

 
 
16:00 - 16:30
 
  Break  
  16:30 - 18:00   session 4
SysML Applications
  • From SADT to SysML: formulation of an embedding
    Pascal Roques – A2-Artal Innovation (F)

  • Combining SysML and formal methods for safety requirements verification
    Jean-Francois Pétin, Dominique Evrot, Gérard Morel – Université de Nancy (F), and Pascal Lamy – INRS (F)

 

  Tutorial 1: Continued  
  18:00 - 20:00  
Concert
 
 
                     

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program   -   Detailed View

 
 
 

Wednesday, December 8

 
         
  9:00 - 10:30   session 5
Testing
  • Using model-checking to improve reliability in legacy systems evolution: A case study
    Miriam C. Bergue Alves – Instituto de Aeronáutica
    e Espaço (BR) and Ricardo Silva Carvalho – Instituto Tecnólogico de Aeronáttica (BR)

  • Architecture-driven testing using TTCN-3
    Axel Rennoch, Steffen Lüdtke, and Klaus-Dietrich Engel – Fraunhofer FOKUS (D)

  • Model-based integration testing of distributed systems
    Thomas Bauer – Fraunhofer IESE (D)

 

  session 6
Tutorial 2

Complexity and systems engineering
Joseph K. DeRosa – Consultant (USA)

 

 
 
10:30 - 11:00
 
  Break  
  11:00 - 12:30   session 7
SOA
  • Prototype tools for understanding SOA and dynamic approaches (Presentation & demo)
    Norman Wilde, Laura White, John Coffey, Tom Reichherzer, Sharon Simmons, Joshua Dault, Juan Gil Restrepo, and Douglas Leal – University of West Florida (USA)

  •  simpleSOAD®  2.0 : Architecture and governance
    Libero Maesano and Fabio De Rosa – Simple Engineering (I)

 

  Tutorial 2: Continued  
 
12:30 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 15:30   session 8
Information Systems
  • Measuring intangible IS assets (data, rules, processes): Assessing Enterprise Architecture
    Pierre Bonnet – Orchestra Networks (F)

  •  Lessons learned developing the Nuxeo EP open source, component-based, ECM platform
    Stéphane Fermigier – NUXEO (F)

 

  Tutorial 2: Continued  
  15:30 - 16:00  
Break
 
 
  16:30 - 17:30   session 8
Information Systems (Continued)
  • Architecting knowledge management systems for dynamic enterprise systems
    Eugene Xavier Papu Antony – Hexaware (IND), K. Govinda, and Rayabhagi Srikanth – VIT University (IND) 

  • Towards classification of hybrid integration systems
    Wadii Hadi, Ahmed Zellou, and Bouchaib Bounabat – ENSIAS (MA)

 

session 9
AOP

  • Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of Java, AspectJ and Jboss AOP using the GoF design patterns
    Soumeya Debboub and Djamel Meslati – University Badji-Mokhtar, Annaba (DZ)

 

  Tutorial 2: Continued  

 

 

 
 

ICSSEA 2010 - Program    -  Detailed View

 
 
 

Thursday, December 9

 
         
  9:00 - 10:30   session 10
Requirements
  • Detecting feature interferences in PHP-based Web applications
    Shin Nakajima – National Institute of Informatics (J)

  • Optimizing software by linguistically-enhanced comparisons of requirements documents and source code graphs
    Manuel Warum, Horst A. Kandutsch, Günter Fliedl, and Christian Winkler – Universität Klagenfurt (A)

  • A proposed model for enhancing the software requirements validation process
    Yousra M. Saad and Ramadan Moawad – Arab Academy for Sciences and Technology (EG)

 

  session 13
Tutorial 3

System Modeling with SysML/UML
J
ean-Michel Bruel, Agusti Canals, and Pascal Roques – SysML-France (F)

 

 
 
10:30 - 11:00
 
  Break  
  11:00 - 12:30   session 11
VV & Formal Methods
  • Integrating formal methods in the software development process
    Isabelle Perseil – INSERM (F) and Philippe Leblanc – IBM (F) 

  • The SMV method, a global approach to optimize system quality and cost reduction through combining requirement traceability, model-checking, and simulation (Presentation & Demo)
    Sany Maamari – COGENIT (F)

  Tutorial 3: Continued  
 
12:30 - 14:00
 
  Lunch  
  14:00 - 16:00   session 12
Process & Project Managment
  • SwAMP: A framework for the development of a software acquisition management plan
    Michele A. Masters – The MITRE Corp (USA)
     

  • Experience with the SCRUM process
    Gérard Memmi – Telecom Paristech (F)

  • Successful experiment and implementation of agile and CMMI ML3 with learnt lessons moving to a hybrid model
    Ahmad A. Mahdy – Raya Corp (EG)

  • Using process and product quality assurance to measure process business alignment
    Santiago Matalonga – Universidad ORT (UY) and Tomas San Feliu – Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (E)

 

  session 15
Quality Assessment & VV
  • Information systems modelling for performant information V&V
    Michel Lanque – Alcatel-Lucent (F) and Philippe Larvet – Consultant (F)

  • Scalable precision software analysis for high integrity software
    André Frizat – Coverity (GB)

  • How application structural quality helps reducing costs, risks, and defects
    Dominique Bordereaux – Directeur Technique, CAST Software (F) and Nicolas Bidaux, Consultant, CAST Software (F)

 

 
 
  16:00 - 18:00   session 14
Closing

Software engineering models, metrics, and tools research: Progress and challenges  
Narayan C. Debnath Winona State University (USA)

Engineering of large-scale complex systems  
Dominique Luzeaux Direction Générale de l’Armement (F)

WEBINAR

Measuring and Managing Technical Debt in Application Portofolios  
 Bill Curtis - CAST Software (USA)


 

 
                     

 

 

 


TUTORIAL 1

Basics and application trends for the Testing and Test Control Notation TTCN-3

Tuesday, December 8, 14:00-17:30

Axel Rennoch and Ina Schieferdecker – Fraunhofer FOKUS (D)

Strong dependencies exist between innovations – standards and markets: Innovations influence standards and markets. Standards have impacts on markets and often are the basis for innovations. The market solutions are combined into standards. And new markets could be understood as an innovation. The testing technology TTCN-3 appears in all of these aspects. It is an established standard widely used in industry; it includes and brings up innovative concepts. This technology is evolving due to increasing industrial requirements and new research ideas.

The roots of today’s “Testing and Test Control Notation” (TTCN-3) started in the 80s. New tool and industrial test suite standards appeared shortly after its first publication by ISO. Initially used in telecommunication, today TTCN-3 is applied for testing complex software in nearly all industrial domains. In particular, new application areas are automotive, medical, aerospace, and finance systems. TTCN-3 is a success story.

Engineering departments of tool manufacturers and research institutes are using TTCN-3 as a target notation in the context of model-based testing. This year the European Standardization Institute (ETSI) has published several innovations that provide a standardized basis to the industry for innovative testing. Substantial work has been undertaken for “embedded TTCN-3” that includes real-time aspects and continuous systems. In the case of TTCN-3 the standardization bodies succeeded to create an engine for innovation and new markets.

The tutorial provides the understanding of basic concepts together with a presentation of latest concepts and new directions for the test technology TTCN-3.

 

 

 

 

 




Axel Rennoch
is a computer scientist and project manager at the German Fraunhofer Institute for Open Communication Systems in Berlin. As member of the Competence Center “Modeling and Testing for System and Service Solutions (MOTION)”, he is leading validation and testing projects on next generation networks and software technologies. He has strong technical experiences with the development and validation of industrial test solutions using the standardized test technology TTCN in the telecom and automotive domain, e.g. for ATM, VoIP/Sigtran, CCM, ISUP/ISDN, MOST, SIP/SDP, and IMS. During this work he participated very actively in national and international standardization groups (e.g. ISO, ATM-Forum, OMG, and ETSI) and has been publishing research papers continuously.

 

 




Prof. Dr.-Ing. Ina Schieferdecker
studied Mathematical Computer Science at Humboldt-University Berlin and did her PhD in 1994 at Technical University Berlin on performance-extended specifications and analysis of QoS characteristics. Since 1997, she is heading the Competence Center for Testing, Interoperability, and Performance at the Fraunhofer Institute on Open Communication Systems (FOKUS), Berlin and is heading now the Competence Center Modeling and Testing for System and Service Solutions (MOTION). She is Professor on Engineering and Testing of Telecommunication Systems at Technical University Berlin since 2003. Prof. Schieferdecker works since 1994 in the area of design, analysis, testing and evaluation of communication systems using specification-based techniques and authored many scientific publications. She is co-founder of the Testing Technologies IST GmbH company (Berlin) and member of the German Testing Board.

 

 

 

 

 

 
TUTORIAL 2

Complexity and Systems Engineering

Wednesday, 9 December, 09:00-17:30

Dr Joseph K. DeRosa – Consultant (USA)

Systems engineering is on the verge of great change.  Traditional systems engineering processes and tools are proving to be inadequate to deal with the scale and complexity of many modern-day systems.  Complex systems are habitually late-to-market and over budget.  Many are obsolete before they are delivered, or they otherwise fall short of expectations.  When projects are overwhelmed by complexity, they tend to “muddle through” using traditional tools and heroic efforts – sometimes they are cancelled altogether.  There are of course successes.  People are building complex systems.  Ad hoc methods are springing up to cope with complexity.  What is missing is a solid framework – one that would give a deep understanding of the observed successes and failures, and one that could be leveraged to invent new approaches. 

This tutorial is intended to meet that complexity challenge head on by delving into the theory and practice of complex systems engineering. It sifts through the wealth of information in complexity science and management science to bring forth the theoretical and empirical underpinnings that form the basis for successful engineering of complex systems.   Since there is no consensus on what constitute the basics in complex systems engineering, the tutorial should be viewed as a cutting edge attempt at establishing its intellectual content.  It seeks to harness complexity, not to deny its existence, and it is but one step on the path to our systems engineering future. The tutorial is presented in four modules. 

The first module begins with a history of systems engineering, then moves into the rationale, scope and context of complex systems engineering.  It discusses the tsunami of change that has brought about the need for new methods.   It scopes the system as an interconnected enterprise of people, processes and technology, differentiating complex systems from those that are merely complicated or difficult.  

The second module explains a number of applicable fundamentals from complexity and management sciences.  It focuses on networks, self-organization and adaptation.  It shows how system behavior can move from orderly to chaotic based on first principles.  It discusses such topics as “small worlds,” loose coupling, 80-20 rules, layered architectures, resiliency and the innovation-integration process.  These fundamentals become the foundation on which complex systems engineering is built.

Based on these fundamentals, the third module lays out three essential elements of complex systems engineering: Development through Adaptation, Strategic Technical Planning and Enterprise Governance.  It discusses such topics as the requirements conundrum in complex adaptive systems, enterprise standards as strategic convergence points, X-Teams and governance of the commons.

The fourth module defines several Enterprise Systems Engineering Processes and cites case studies that have successfully applied them.  It lays out the way ahead for practitioners and researchers in the burgeoning field of complex systems engineering.

Much of the material presented summarizes chapters written by the presenter in a recent book,  [G.R. Rebovich and B.E. White (Ed), Enterprise Systems Engineering, Advances in the Theory and Practice, Boca Raton, FL, CRC Press – Taylor Francis Group, July 2010.]. Attendees to the tutorial may purchase on site a copy of the book at a preferential price (see Registration Form).

 Learner Outcomes: Attendees will learn:

1.       What a complex system is and what it is not

2.       Why there is a need for new systems engineering processes to address complex systems

3.       What are the fundamental principles driving complex systems engineering

4.       What are some of the strategies that are proving to be effective in engineering complex systems

 

 

 

 




Joseph DeRosa
has over 25 year experience in systems engineering.  As Director of Systems Engineering at the MITRE Corporation (USA), he oversaw the systems engineering of numerous major government programs and participated in research in complex systems.   He has delivered numerous papers on the subject worldwide at IEEE, INCOSE and ICSSEA conferences, delivering a keynote address at ICSSEA 2008.  He was a former staff member at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory and Director of Business Development for LINKABIT Corporation, as well as an industry consultant to many aerospace firms.  He has a PhD in Electrical Engineering and attended Babson College Graduate School of Business.  He studied complex systems at both the Santa Fe Institute and the New England Complex Systems Institute. 

 

 

 

 


TUTORIAL 3

System Modeling with SysML/UML

Thursday, December 9, 9:00-12:30

Jean-Michel Bruel, Agusti Canals, and Pascal Roques – SysML-France (F)

The OMG notations UML™ for Software Engineering, and the SysML™ for Systems Engineering share a lot in common. Nevertheless, while UML comes with several development methods (Unified Process being the one advocated by the UML™ initiators), not only SysML™ is not yet integrated in some existing system development method, but for modern systems, fully software oriented, the co-existence of the two notations make sometimes systems developments even harder. The goal of this tutorial is to illustrate one possible way of making those notations work together in a complementary way.

After a quick recall of the basic principles of UML™ and a short but illustrative presentation of SysML™, some existing systems’ development approaches are detailed. The advantages/drawbacks of each of them are highlighted, leading to some heuristics for a global method that uses both notations. The principles of the approach, as well as a full example, is then detailed and practiced by the attendees.

Detailed outline:

1.       The UML notation and the principles of the associated methods

2.       SysML: why and how?

3.       Systems development principles

4.       Software and System Development (Methodology description and Case study: Alarm Clock)

Despite the fact that SysML™ is a relatively new notation, the level of the tutorial is not advanced. According to the attendees background the tutorial can serve as an introduction, but the expected level is intermediate. 

Knowledge of UML is required, a first overview of SysML will be a help, and some background in systems development will be a plus. 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 


Jean-Michel Bruel
received his Ph.D. from the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse) in December 1996. From September 1997 to August 2008, he was associate professor at the University of Pau. He is currently full professor at the University of Toulouse, head of the Computer Science Department of the Blagnac Institute of Technology. He has been teaching for 18 years for both academia and industry, and teaches UML/SysML at M.Sc. level. He is involved in several industrial projects around SysML (e.g., System On Chips, Complex simulation systems). He is co-founder of the SysML-France association.

 




Agusti Canals
is a software engineer from the University Paul Sabatier (Toulouse) and has been working at CS since 1981. Now, he is Deputy Technical Director of CS, Communication&Systems, project manager, senior software engineering consultant, SysML Certified at the Model User level and UML 2 Certified at Professional Advanced level.

 



 


Pascal Roques
is an engineer from ENSICA (Toulouse). He has more than 20 years experience in consulting and training on modelling, with SADT, OMT, UML, and SysML. Pascal is the author of several books on UML and SysML published by Eyrolles. He is also UML 2 Certified at Professional Advanced level and co-founder of SysML France.

 
 

 

 

 


INAUGURAL LECTURE

Architecting and Innovating: The Role of System Critical Parameters 

Ronald B. Campbell, Jr.

Senior Lecturer

Department of Mechanical Engineering - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Cambridge, MA 02139, USA

Abstract. Innovation has been demonstrated to be the major factor in economic growth, and innovation is driven by the development of new technology. Much of the System Engineering literature seems based on the presumption that the technology is developed and relatively stable. Recent well-publicized delays in a number of major new systems demonstrate the untenability of this presumption. This paper explores the co-development of emergent technology and system architecture to support the rapid and effective development of innovative systems while avoiding major downstream problems caused by technology unreadiness. The focus is primarily on systems designed for competitive commercial markets, but much of the approach is readily transferable to contracted larger scale systems.

 

 

 

 




Ronald B. Campbell, Jr.
is currently a Senior Lecturer within the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute for Technology. Dr Campbell teaches courses in engineering design. His current research interests are product realization processes, focussing on the very early stages, and solar thermal energy. He was at Xerox for 17 years in management roles responsible for the development of technology, architecture, and new products and served as Chief Technical Officer. Prior to that, he was at Raytheon for 18 years with responsibilities for advanced development and research and served as Vice President for Research and Development. Campbell has a PhD from Harvard in Applied Physics.

 

 

 

 

 


INAUGURAL LECTURE

Software engineering must be collaboration-aware

Vassilka D. Kirova

Alcatel-Lucent

Murray Hill, NJ 07974 - USA

Abstract: As software development becomes more collaborative, all aspects of software engineering and their management need to accommodate and support collaboration.  In this talk we focus on inter-organizational collaboration in software product and tool development, which is of increasing importance and great potential, and yet increasingly complicated by the many complex relationships and dependencies, regulations and cultural differences. 

Software projects are intrinsically cooperative, requiring many software professionals to coordinate their efforts and to collaborate at many levels to produce a large software system. Integral to this effort is establishing shared mental models, achieving alignment on the system objective, and building common understanding of the shared artifacts created through out the development process.  Although the selection of a good support environment for collaboration and collaborative development is essential in such efforts it does not address the orthogonal question—whether and how the set of artifacts and development processes need to be modified to promote and optimize collaboration. Further, continuing trends of outsourcing and offshoring, subcontracting and forming joint ventures, as well as of academic-industrial collaboration, expand the collaboration scope and raise new challenges and numerous opportunities. While legal issues and management support appear to be the most substantial areas, we discuss many other issues and contend that all aspects of software development need to be re-examined to effectively address the collaboration needs.

A key challenge in multi-organizational collaboration efforts is that institutional and team responsibilities need to be assigned early in the project inception phase which requires the scoping, decomposition of the product and the definition of the overall project structure to be established well before the application and often the technology to be developed is even marginally understood. That, especially in large, complex or innovative projects, in turn requires flexibility in assignment of responsibilities and in interactions between teams and partnering institutions.  It further requires flexibility in defining the scope and allocation of responsibilities to the components, subsystems or features they are to deliver.  Given the collaboration constraints it is crucial to understand that the best high-level decomposition may not be the optimal structural or functional decomposition, but will also be driven by management objectives, technical expertise, resources, and other considerations in the individual organizations. Any tradeoffs evidently should not devalue the collaboration below any established cost/benefits threshold or jeopardize the system objectives.  This is a critical consideration in assembling the collaborative venture at the start. Other challenges arise in the areas of governance, budget and customer interactions, allocation of credit, and risk management. We also examine issues related to areas such as requirements and knowledge management, architecture and testing, evolution and intellectual property.

A notable current trend in both the technical and management aspects of software development is agility.  Agile frameworks deal well with uncertainty and accommodate changing needs and requirements through ongoing customer involvement, sort iterations, open communications, and the application of practices such as retrospectives and steady refactoring. They are further characterized by self-organizing cross-functional teams, application of technical practices such as test-driven and acceptance test-driven development, test automation and continues integration. Agile projects also benefit from avoiding unnecessary specification and upfront extensive analysis.  Agile methods bring the much needed flexibility but can they address all the challenges of multi-organizational collaboration efforts? In the talk we will address this and other questions, concerns, known challenges, and potential solutions.
 
 

 

 

 




Vassilka Kirova
is a senior manager at Alcatel-Lucent and a research professor at New Jersey Institute of Technology.  At Alcatel-Lucent she leads the Modeling Methods and Automation domain in the Networks R&D Transformation and Quality Organization. Her areas of work and interest include automated software engineering, lean and agile production systems, artifact flow, dependency tracking and automated traceability, agent-based software monitors, model-based development and ubiquitous software models, and knowledge management in collaborative development projects. She has also worked on architecture definition and specification projects, including enterprise architectures for policy-based management of quality of service in converged networks, and system and services management architectures. Kirova holds a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the New Jersey Institute of Technology. She writes on a variety of topics, including requirements and architecture specification, software models, systems integration, automated traceability and collaborative software development.
 

 

 

 

 


INAUGURAL LECTURE

Smart electrical grids

Colette Lewiner

Vice President, Energy, Utilities, and Chemicals Global Sector Leader

Capgemini (F)

The new trends related to energy mix changes-and notably the non schedulable renewal energy generation growth- and customer behaviors trends are strongly impacting the electricity grid management.

To respond to these new challenges, a new grid concept, smart grids, has emerged. These smart grids will necessitate new equipments and will be more digitally managed. A new IT architecture will be needed as well as data storage increased capacity, data quality assessment, information exchanges security protocols and data flow management. Communication standards need to be adopted to manage the information flow on the grids, with the customers and within the buildings.

The market opportunities for equipment manufacturers and information technology & communication providers could be very significant. However, they are many pre-requisites on industrial Research and Development commitments, regulation changes, project financing and public acceptance that have to be met timely.
 

 

 

 

 

 


Colette Lewiner A graduate of the École Normale Supérieure, Colette has obtained her PhD in Physics in 1973. After an academic career she joined Électricité de France (EDF) in 1979 and became Executive Vice President in 1998. She joined the Cogema Group (now Areva) in 1992 becoming Chairwoman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer of SGN Eurisys Group.

Since May 2000, Colette has been Vice President and Global Leader of the Energy, Utilities and Chemicals Sector of Capgemini Group. In September 2010 Colette has been elected TDF (Télédiffusion de France) non executive chairwoman. She is also a non Executive Director of Nexans, La Poste, TGS Nopec, Bouygues, and Lafarge. She is a member of the French Academy of Technology. She was President of the European Nuclear Society from 1992 to 1994. She is a “Commandeur” of the Legion of Honour and the Order of Merit.
 

 

 

 

 


CLOSING LECTURE

Software Engineering Models, Metrics and Tools Research – Progress and Challenges

Narayan C. Debnath

PhD, D. Sc.

Professor of Computer Science
Winona State University, USA

Ndebnath@winona.edu

This keynote presentation will describe some recent progress in software models, metrics and tools research, and will outline potential future research directions and challenges.
Software Models and Metrics, an area of Software Engineering, plays an important role in the analysis, evaluation and testing of software, and thus allows to effectively deal with the software management, planning and maintenance issues in order to help enhance the maintenance phase of the software life cycle.
In software models and metrics research, attention has been directed toward reducing software cost. To this end, researchers have attempted to find relationships between the characteristics of programs and the difficulty of performing tasks. The objective has been to develop abstract models and measures of software complexity that can be used for cost projection, manpower allocation, and program and programmer evaluation. In the software engineering models and metrics literature, a number of abstract models, essentially directed graph representations, of imperative language software have been proposed and analyzed to derive useful properties that may help understanding computer programs and thus allow better maintainability of software.
In this presentation, a family of abstract models for representing imperative language software will be described. The basic concepts, definitions, and some applications of these graph models will be presented. These graphs may have wide range of applications in software engineering and technology. These graphs may serve as potential tools for (a) the study interconnection or integration complexity, an area that needs serious attention, (b) the study of compiler optimization, a topic to help compiler design and code optimization, (c) the study and analysis of concurrent programs, an area that may be useful to study the characteristics of concurrent programs, (d) the study and research in expression and statement complexity, an important topic in metrics research and may help to estimate program clarity, and (e) the study of the characteristics of software involving recursion, an area that needs to be addressed to compute the complexity of recursive programs. Once these models are defined with a sound theoretical basis and accurately validated, the entire family of graphs may serve as potential tools for further study and research in mathematics, computer science, software engineering, and technology. Moreover, these software models and related concepts may potentially lead to new research directions in software models, metrics and Tools. The models can help develop automated software tools for a number of applications in software engineering. They can be directly used for defining software complexity metrics and may potentially serve as software testing tools. They can be applied and/or redefined to study other programming language paradigms including Object Oriented programming languages, applicative programming languages, and concurrent programming languages.

 

 

 

 




Dr. Narayan C. Debnath has been a Full Professor of Computer Science since 1989 and currently the Chairman of Computer Science at Winona State University, Minnesota, USA. Dr. Debnath is a recipient of a Doctorate degree in Computer Science and a Doctorate degree in Applied Physics (Electrical Engineering). He served as the President, Vice President, and Conference Coordinator of the International Society for Computers and Their Applications (ISCA), and currently serving in the ISCA Board of Directors. He served as the Acting Chairman of the Department of Computer Science at Winona State University and received numerous Honors and Awards. During 1986-1989, Dr. Debnath was a faculty of Computer Science at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls, USA, where he was nominated for the National Science Foundation Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1989.

Dr. Debnath has taught a wide range of undergraduate and graduate courses in computer science including Software Engineering, Software Testing, Theory of Computation, Compiler Design, and Principles of Programming Languages. He has made original research contributions on Software Engineering Models, Metrics and Tools, Software Testing, Software Management, and Information Science, Technology and Management. For the past several years, he has been working on research problems involving the development of software models, software complexity metrics and tools, Software testing theory, techniques and tools, Software design tools, techniques and environments, and Information technology and management. Dr. Debnath is an author or co-author of over 300 publications in numerous refereed journals and conference proceedings in Computer Science, Information Science, Information Technology, System Sciences, Mathematics, and Electrical Engineering. He has been serving, since 2005, as the Guest Editor of the special issues of the Journal of Computational Methods in Science and Engineering (JCMSE) published by the IOS Press, the Netherlands.

Professor Debnath has made numerous teaching and research presentations at various national and international conferences, industries, and teaching and research institutions in Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America. He has been serving as an international teaching and research advisor/coordinator of the Master of Software Engineering Program at the National Universities in Argentina, South America, since 2000. He has offered courses and workshops on Software Engineering and Software Testing at the universities in South America, Asia, and Middle East.

Dr. Debnath served as the General Chair, Program Chair, invited Keynote Speaker, Tutorial Chair, and Session Organizer and Chair of the international conferences sponsored by various professional societies including the IEEE, IEEE Computer Society, the Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM), International Association of Computer and Information Science (ACIS), International Association for Science and Technology in Education (IASTED), Arab Computer Society, and the International Society for Computers and Their Applications (ISCA). Dr. Debnath is a member of the ACM, IEEE Computer Society, Arab Computer Society, and ISCA.

 

 

 

 

 


CLOSING LECTURE

Engineering of large-scale complex systems

Dominique LUZEAUX

Dr Hab., Dipl.-Ing.

Direction Générale de l’Armement

dominique.luzeaux@polytechnique.org

In the last decades, the systems designed in major domains (banking, health, transportation, space, aeronautics, defense) have been increasingly larger. With the growing maturity of information and communication technologies, systems have been interconnected within growing networks, yielding new services through combination of the system functionalities. This leads to an increasing complexity of the resulting large-scale complex systems, which has to be managed in order to take advantage of these system integrations.

This lecture will discuss how system engineering has to cope with such challenges and will present a mid-term vision of the issues system engineering should focus on.

 

 

 

 




Dominique Luzeaux
(École Polytechnique 87, École Nationale Supérieure des Techniques Avancées 1989, PhD Université Paris XI 1991, visiting research scientist at the University of California at Berkeley 1991-1992, Professor Thesis 2001) has occupied various positions within the Ministry of Defense since 1989. Since April 2009 he is Director of the Division in charge of the procurement of Land Systems.

He has published several books in French and English on nanotechnology, system-of-systems engineering, modeling and simulation of complex systems.  He is chairman of the AFIS (Association Française de l’Ingénierie Système) since 2009.

 

 

 

 


CLOSING WEBINAR

MEASURING AND MANAGING TECHNICAL DEBT IN APPLICATION PORTFOLIOS

Bill Curtis - CAST Software (USA).


Technical Debt, which refers to the cost of fixing structural issues that remain in a production application resulting from hastily designed architectures and out-of-standards development, is an objective and direct way of measuring risk in application code base.

Dr. Bill Curtis, co-author of CMM, CAST Chief Scientist, CAST Research Labs will be presenting on the value of an application risk measurement / management program aimed at: reducing technical debt, increasing agility of development teams, enhancing QA efficiency, and improving maintainability while reducing cost of ownership. Early visibility into and measurement of non-functional technical debt in applications is the only way you can truly manage risk as new applications and enhancements are being delivered in support of your business and customers.

The presentation is based on a field study, just completed by CAST Software. It involves 288 applications (108 millions of lines of code) coming from 8 different industrial domains.

 

 

 

 

 

Pre-Conference  event      -       2e JOURNÉE SYSML FRANCE         -       Lundi 6 décembre 2010

 La langue de travail le français

Inscription sur place

13h30-14h00 Accueil

14h00-14h15

Présentation de la journée et de l’association SysML France

• Jean-Michel Bruel, Agusti Canals et Pascal Roques, Fondateurs de SysML France

14h15-15h00

AVATAR : un profil SysML temps réel outillé

• Pierre de Saqui-Sannes – ISAE/LAAS et L. Apvrille – Telecom Paris (Sophia Antipolis)

15h00-15h45

SysML et Modelica

• Jean-Yves Choley, Directeur du LISMMA, SUPMECA et IRIT

15h45-16h15 Pause

16h15-17h00s

De SADT à SysML

Pascal Roques – A2-ARTAL

17h00-17h45

SysML 2.0 : vers la prochaine version majeure

• Laurent Rioux – Thales, membre de l’OMG

17h45-1800h

• Conclusion et discussion

18h00

• Cocktail et Concours d’échec en simultanée

Registration: on site

Information:

agusti.canals@c-s.fr

bruel@irit.fr

pascal.roques@a2-artal.fr